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  #1  
Old July 26th, 2005, 05:12 AM
Jo22 Jo22 is offline
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Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Good day everyone,

I live in Ottawa, and have attached pictures of our 5 year old Evans Cherry Tree. Keep in mind that the fence is 6 feet tall. At the time the pictures were taken, a net was covering it to keep the birds away from the cherries.
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  #2  
Old July 27th, 2005, 01:10 AM
Newt Newt is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Hi Jo,

The pictures are great and the cherries look yummy. What was your question though?

I would definately recommend that you remove the grass from around the base of the tree and apply mulch. Do be sure that the rootflare is exposed as yours looks a like it's planted a bit deep. You should find these helpful.

http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/WO017
http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/Garden/02926.html
http://hort.ifas.ufl.edu/woody/planting/nosoil.htm
http://www.treesaregood.com/treecare/mulching.asp
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/MG089

Newt
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  #3  
Old July 27th, 2005, 04:04 AM
Jo22 Jo22 is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Thanks for your reply. I wanted to share the beauty of the 5 year old tree and know if it has reached maturity.

Jo
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  #4  
Old July 27th, 2005, 06:50 AM
Newt Newt is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

You're very welcome. I did a search at www.google.com and put in the search box:
life span + sweet cherry
and found this site. It says on Table 1 that the life span is 15 to 20 years.
http://www.hort.purdue.edu/ext/HO-190.pdf

Hope that helps,
Newt
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  #5  
Old January 16th, 2006, 01:35 PM
Lucky_P Lucky_P is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Evans is lumped in with the sour/tart or pie cherries, not sweet types. I have one, on its own roots(tissue-cultured) that is about 10 years old, and still going strong.
Left to its own devices, it will sucker, throwing up new sprouts as far as 10-15 ft away from the main trunk, which can be dug and transplanted, to grow into new Evans trees.
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  #6  
Old January 16th, 2006, 03:47 PM
Ron B Ron B is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Seeds Savers Exchange FRUIT, BERRY AND NUT INVENTORY calls it an "English Morello type".
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  #7  
Old January 17th, 2006, 07:24 AM
Lucky_P Lucky_P is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

I'd agree, it's more like the Morello types, but it's not quite the same. Ripens here quite a bit later than Montmorency.
Here's some info from a friend who spoke personally with Dr. Evans:
"Evans cherry -
A Mrs Borward from the Henwood area near Edmonton, Alberta has been growing the Evans since about 1923. She is in her 80's now and says that she got the seeds from her neighbors who got these from the "English" which according to Dr Evans actually meant "Americans" and specifically from Minnesota as the Minnesotans largely settled this part of Edmonton. These Minnesotans were probably of either Ukranian or Norwegian decent and had probably been growing this cherry since the late 1800's.
Dr Evans discovered this cherry in 1976 and slowly but surely got
people interested in trying it.
Some outstanding points of the Evans are: The highest yields in MI for a tart/pie cherry are about 50 pounds per tree. The Evans produces around 150 pounds per tree!
It does very well in light soil. Heavy soil it does ok but tends to
be winter damaged more. Blossoms are not killed by temps as low as five below centigade, which is quite remarkable for a sour cherry."
Then, this, from a friend in Edmonton:
"I'm pruning my Evans to be a "tree", not a bush. Its about 10 ft. tall after 5 years from tissue culture, and looking very much like a "tree" with a single trunk and nice lateral branches. Left without pruning Evans looks like a Nanking cherry bush, with multi stems. I thin the fruit only because Evans seems to want to produce huge quantities of cherries, even in my tough climate, at the expense of tree growth. I hope to grow it to at least 15
feet as a traditional "tree". The taste this year is particularly
excellent, the best "tart" cherry I have ever tasted. When frozen whole in a plastic baggie, they lose much of the tartness and are almost like a true sweet cherry, but I like them just fine fresh off the tree. If you live in a northern climate, zone 3 or 4, and want a very hardy, reliable, very productive, excellent tasting tart cherry, get Evans. Nothing comes remotely close from what I've seen. It MUST be on its own roots however. It may be okay to have it grafted on Mahaleb or Mazzard. That hasn't been tried up here as those two rootstocks would not normally be considered hardy
in zone 3. We just get tissue cultured plants or dig up root suckers. Evans grafts readily, but seems to invariably die over the winter unless it's on its own roots. It seems to do best with grass competition right up to the trunk, and no or very little fertilizer. It virtually seems to thrive best on neglect, quite an unusual trait for a cherry tree."
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  #8  
Old January 17th, 2006, 12:01 PM
Newt Newt is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Lucky P, that was a fantastic read!!!

Newt
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  #9  
Old January 18th, 2006, 07:35 AM
Lucky_P Lucky_P is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

All the reports I've seen on Evans have been from folks in harsh winter climates - especially zone 3/4 areas. In my hot zone 6, 70 miles NW of Nashville TN, it's OK, but Montmorency is better and more productive.
Quite a number of Canadian nurseries offer Evans, but availability for folks in the US is somewhat limited; St. Lawrence Nurseries, in Potsdam NY(they list it as "Bali"), and possibly Kevin Bradley's Edible Forest Nursery, are the most likely US sources, if you'd care to try it.
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  #10  
Old January 20th, 2006, 07:03 AM
Thean Thean is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Howdy Lucky_P,
Thanks for your posting. I was lucky to have seen the original tree around the early 80's. The cherry was introduced by Dr. Ieaun Evans. Many people acused him of naming the cherry after himself. That's not true. The name was given by the tissue culture lab merely as an identification to differentiate it from other cherries that were propagated. However the name stuck.
Every literature class Evans as an English Morello. This is where I find it puzzling. Sour cherries are grouped as Morello and Amarelle types. The Latter has yellow to light red meat and produces clear to very light red juice while the former produces dark red meat with dark red juice. The Evans has all the characteristic of the Amerelle group.
Evans propagate readily with softwood cuttings and root cuttings. Softwood cutting should be taken before the formation of the terminal bud while root cuttings is best taken after defoliation or very early spring.
Those of you interested in sour cherry might want to take note of the six Dwarf Sour cherries bred and released by the University of Saskatchewan. They are Carmine Jewel, Juliet, Romeo, Cupid, Passion and Valentine. All are Sourcherry x Mongolian cherry hybrids. They are hardier than Evans and produce very dark red meat and juice. Some have fantastic brix reading, as high as 22%.
Peace
Thean
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  #11  
Old January 22nd, 2006, 08:55 AM
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mr.shep mr.shep is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

I think for people wanting hardier Fruit Trees for many
western areas in Canada, outside of Ontario, then look
no further than the University of Saskatchewan. I've
known about them for a long while. I got much of the
information on the Pembina Plum through them and
feel that it will be one of their researchers that comes
up with a solid, workable pollinizer for that Plum.
Just give them time to work on it.

Sour Cherries are not so bad to have in cooler areas
that have to feel lucky to be able to grow any Cherries.
My Montmorency is considered to be a tart Cherry
but when they are ripe-ripe they are indeed sweet.
I think the Cherries mentioned by Thean are all
worth looking into for growing as I like the source..

Jim
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  #12  
Old June 25th, 2009, 04:52 AM
Rob Beckers Rob Beckers is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Hi Jo22,

Since this forum does not seem to have private messaging nor E-mail to members (or maybe it's disabled because I'm a new member) I'm posting to this rather old thread. I'm in Ottawa, and looking for an Evans Cherry. None of the nurseries around here carries them, so I am wondering if you could supply me with a sucker from your bush/tree (it seems they produce copious amounts of suckers). If that is a possibility, you can contact me at "Rob-at-solacity-dot-com".

Thanks in advance!

-Rob-

P.S. Great looking cherry!
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  #13  
Old November 27th, 2009, 06:54 AM
taint taint is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

I hope you find one Rob, have you had any luck so far?? I was looking for Employers Liability Insurance for ages and have had to do without one and its a shame because they are so lovely!!

Glad to see just how good the tree is looking :)

Last edited by taint; December 23rd, 2009 at 02:21 AM.
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  #14  
Old November 27th, 2009, 07:55 AM
JanR JanR is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

T&T Seeds in Winnipeg sells them. I don't know whether you would be able to import them to the US.

I would really like to get an Evans cherry too and I am thinking of doing it this year.
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  #15  
Old November 27th, 2009, 02:56 PM
northerngrapes northerngrapes is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by taint View Post
I hope you find one Rob, have you had any luck so far?? I was looking for one of these for ages and have had to do without one and its a shame because they are so lovely!!

Glad to see just how good the tree is looking :)

You can purchase the tree in the US it's known as Bali


http://www.northscaping.com/InfoZone.../FS-0097.shtml

Cheers

Kim

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob Beckers View Post
Hi Jo22,

Since this forum does not seem to have private messaging nor E-mail to members (or maybe it's disabled because I'm a new member) I'm posting to this rather old thread. I'm in Ottawa, and looking for an Evans Cherry. None of the nurseries around here carries them, so I am wondering if you could supply me with a sucker from your bush/tree (it seems they produce copious amounts of suckers). If that is a possibility, you can contact me at "Rob-at-solacity-dot-com".

Thanks in advance!

-Rob-

P.S. Great looking cherry!
If you go the Jeffries Nursery website you can order from them. You may also want to look at some of the other varieties from The U of Saskatchewan fruit program as well.

http://www.jeffriesnurseries.com/p44-50.pdf

The U of S has sources for Evans in Ontario and the US.

http://www.fruit.usask.ca/DwarfSourC....html#Articles

Cheers

kim

Last edited by Daniel Mosquin; November 27th, 2009 at 03:06 PM. Reason: Merged 2 posts into 1
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  #16  
Old November 28th, 2009, 05:25 AM
Rob Beckers Rob Beckers is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Thanks for the help everyone!
Alas, no luck yet in finding an Evans cherry. None of my local nurseries could nor wanted to order one for me (I called all of them in a very wide radius), and my mail-order plan to order a number of fruit trees from DNA Gardens came to nothing as their business was sold (no more mail order). Jeffries Nurseries certainly has a nice selection, but they are wholesale only. So that won't work either. In short, I'm still looking.

I'll go through the list of UofS nurseries, hopefully one of those does retail mail order. If anyone has suggestions for a source (in Canada) of various cold-hardy fruit trees please let me know.

-Rob-
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  #17  
Old November 29th, 2009, 07:31 AM
JanR JanR is offline
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Re: Evans Cherry tree (maturity)

Here is the link to the Evans Cherry at T&T Seeds. http://www.ttseeds.com/PHP/mcat.php?...cat=O&mgrp=61B
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