UBC Botanical Garden Forums  

» UBC Botanical Garden


Go Back   UBC Botanical Garden Forums > Plants: Identification

Post New ThreadReply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old July 9th, 2005, 08:36 AM
carver carver is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: East Texas
Posts: 4
Thorn Trees

I have a couple of thorn trees growing on my property, I would like to identify them. How do I go about this?

carver
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old July 9th, 2005, 09:18 AM
Michael F Michael F is offline
Plant Enthusiast (1000+ posts)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Britain zone 8/9
Posts: 9,669
Re: Thorn Trees

Can you post some close-up photos here?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old July 9th, 2005, 09:42 AM
carver carver is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: East Texas
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

See attachment
Attached Thumbnails (click on thumbnail to enlarge)
Click image for larger version

Name:	Thorn Tree.jpg
Views:	2391
Size:	209.5 KB
ID:	7153  
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old July 9th, 2005, 10:02 AM
Ron B Ron B is offline
Ardent Plant Enthusiast (10000+ posts)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Edmonds, WA USA (Z8)
Posts: 18,402
Re: Thorn Trees

Looks like a pear (Pyrus sp.). Don't know about your area, but elsewhere Callery pears have gone wild.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old July 9th, 2005, 10:14 AM
carver carver is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: East Texas
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

Looks like a pear (Pyrus sp.). Don't know about your area, but elsewhere Callery pears have gone wild.

Will have to do some research. This tree is dangerous! It has thorns on the end of each leafy branch! Do Callery pears have thorns?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old July 9th, 2005, 11:20 AM
carver carver is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: East Texas
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

"Some callery pear cultivars are very thorny", This was taken from http://www.floridata.com/ref/P/pyru_cal.cfm . You just might be right! Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old July 19th, 2005, 11:33 AM
CharlieGirl CharlieGirl is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Molalla, Oregon
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

Hi, My name is Charlie, I live in the Molalla, Oregon area, And I as well have a VERY LARGE thorn tree. It has leaves that resemble a type of Ivy. It does not bare anything except THORNS! My horse has eaten the leaves off this tree and has not acted ill from it. But I too wish I knew what it is? It does try and make starts in other places around my yard but I pull them out! I have no idea what this tree is? But it it as big as a fir tree and way over 14feet high. Thanks, CharlieGirl

Quote:
Originally Posted by carver
Looks like a pear (Pyrus sp.). Don't know about your area, but elsewhere Callery pears have gone wild.

Will have to do some research. This tree is dangerous! It has thorns on the end of each leafy branch! Do Callery pears have thorns?
Attached Thumbnails (click on thumbnail to enlarge)
Click image for larger version

Name:	000_1315.JPG
Views:	3110
Size:	428.7 KB
ID:	7352  

Last edited by CharlieGirl; July 19th, 2005 at 12:52 PM. Reason: added pics
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old July 19th, 2005, 12:58 PM
Michael F Michael F is offline
Plant Enthusiast (1000+ posts)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Britain zone 8/9
Posts: 9,669
Re: Thorn Trees

Yours is a Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia)
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old July 19th, 2005, 01:09 PM
CharlieGirl CharlieGirl is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Molalla, Oregon
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

Are they dangerous or deadly to horses if eaten?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old July 19th, 2005, 06:21 PM
fourd's Avatar
fourd fourd is offline
Generous Contributor (100+ posts)
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: X-maryland now New Mexico
Posts: 160
Re: Thorn Trees

I can't say how they effect horses, but if your horses love to eat them then they are probably OK. Animals seen to have a better sence then we do when it comes to poisionous plants. Also what is poisionous to us may not be for them and vice. However, these are not particularly good trees to have. The Ornimental pear does has nice flowers in spring, which is why it is sold, but suffers from storm damage -- big limbs will fall where you don't want them to. Most of the downed limbs I see around here are Bradbury Pears! Not sure what good the locus tree has going for it, but it leaks sap like mist (disease.insect prone?) that can be nasty to clean off your automobile.
__________________
I Experiment!
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old July 20th, 2005, 05:35 AM
wrygrass2's Avatar
wrygrass2 wrygrass2 is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Spokane, WA, USA
Posts: 577
Re: Thorn Trees

One of the big problems with the black locust here in Spokane is the Locust Borer. See http://www.na.fs.fed.us/spfo/pubs/fi...ust/locust.htm for US Forestry paper on the insect. Although that page suggest using pesticides, that would be up to the homeowner.

Because of its other habits, reseeding at the drop of hat (or seed :) in this case), as well as usually containing dead wood from the borer, it really isn't a desirable tree in my estimation. It leafs out late, well into May here and the tree without any leaves is not very esthetically pleasing, to my notion. When they are in flower they are a beautiful tree, but that is only 3 weeks or less out of 52.

Also, it is not a small tree, as there are some just down the block that are well over 60 feet. And of course the larger it is the more seeds it produces. So if it is small now, now might be the time to think about removing it from your property.

You can find a webpage of people who like Black Locust at http://www.blacklocust.org/whylocust.html, so I guess the choice is up to the homeowner. :) As always, beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Harry
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old July 21st, 2005, 10:42 AM
CharlieGirl CharlieGirl is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Molalla, Oregon
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

Quote:
Originally Posted by fourd
I can't say how they effect horses, but if your horses love to eat them then they are probably OK. Animals seen to have a better sence then we do when it comes to poisionous plants. Also what is poisionous to us may not be for them and vice. However, these are not particularly good trees to have. The Ornimental pear does has nice flowers in spring, which is why it is sold, but suffers from storm damage -- big limbs will fall where you don't want them to. Most of the downed limbs I see around here are Bradbury Pears! Not sure what good the locus tree has going for it, but it leaks sap like mist (disease.insect prone?) that can be nasty to clean off your automobile.
********* I know horses are not always that smart when it comes to trees and plants as my girlfriend lost 2 horses to Tanzy weed when we were young. So I know that they will eat things that are not always good for them. I'm going to try and post a picture here of the entire tree but it may be to large of a file to upload. But as I said in another quote, That this tree does not bare anything except thorns. And I keep finding starts of this tree in other places on the property and I pull them right away.
Attached Thumbnails (click on thumbnail to enlarge)
Click image for larger version

Name:	000_1319.JPG
Views:	1146
Size:	93.5 KB
ID:	7375   Click image for larger version

Name:	000_1315.JPG
Views:	933
Size:	36.2 KB
ID:	7376  
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old July 21st, 2005, 04:29 PM
wrygrass2's Avatar
wrygrass2 wrygrass2 is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Spokane, WA, USA
Posts: 577
Re: Thorn Trees

Charliegirl,

Talking two different trees in this thread. Yours is the the black locust or Robinia pseudoacacia as stated above. And although you might not see your tree in flower, (it also reproduces vegetatively or from root suckers without flowering) this tree in general actually has a large pea-like blossom late in the spring with a peapod-like seed. I sympathize with your plight as I have had several growing on either end of my block for some time now and controlling their spread is definitely a problem.

As far as your concern about your horse foraging on them, I found this link that states that they are poisonous.

http://www.noble.org/Ag/Forage/HorseForage/page16.html

also

http://www.ovma.org/food/food_moaafood.html

But the best source of information would probably be your vet.

Harry
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old July 22nd, 2005, 02:46 AM
wrygrass2's Avatar
wrygrass2 wrygrass2 is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Spokane, WA, USA
Posts: 577
Re: Thorn Trees

CharlieGirl,

Too, if you are concerned with the identification of the tree on this forum or any other, the best thing you could do would be to take a sample of a branch with leaves, to the nearest nursery or county extension agent. The extension agent if you have one, could most likely tell you about its poisonous properties.

But I must say, the experts who frequent this forum, not including myself of course, as I'm just an amateur in comparison, are the best you are going to find. They are certainly willing to make corrections if they see a plant misidentified for instance. So since there weren't any differences on the identification of your tree, I for one would think it to be the correct one.

Harry
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old July 22nd, 2005, 05:54 PM
CharlieGirl CharlieGirl is offline
Registered Plus (3-99 posts)
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Molalla, Oregon
Posts: 4
Re: Thorn Trees

Quote:
Originally Posted by wrygrass
CharlieGirl,

Too, if you are concerned with the identification of the tree on this forum or any other, the best thing you could do would be to take a sample of a branch with leaves, to the nearest nursery or county extension agent. The extension agent if you have one, could most likely tell you about its poisonous properties.

But I must say, the experts who frequent this forum, not including myself of course, as I'm just an amateur in comparison, are the best you are going to find. They are certainly willing to make corrections if they see a plant misidentified for instance. So since there weren't any differences on the identification of your tree, I for one would think it to be the correct one.

Harry
*******
Harry, Thanks Much For Your Reply! Now Do You Have Any Idea On How To Kill This Tree? I Am Finding New Starts Of It Just Growing All Over My Yard And I Can't Stand This Tree So It's Not Like I'm Wanting It To Grow Anywhere Else~ But It Thinks It's Ok To Do Such! I Was Told By Someone Else That They Plant Themselves "Everywhere"! And I Am Forever Pulling Up The Starts! Any Ideas On How To ((Murder)) :D This Tree Without Having It Fall On My House ?? But That Will Still Kill The Roots Too?? Thanks, CharlieGirl
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old July 22nd, 2005, 06:44 PM
Ralph Walton Ralph Walton is offline
Generous Contributor (100+ posts)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Denman Island,BC
Posts: 634
Re: Thorn Trees

Pull some of your "starts" to see whether they are seedlings (typically roots will taper off to nothing) or suckers (often pull with a 'snap' and have a single larger "root" which will be broken off at the bottom). If they are seedlings, then carry on pulling. Suckers can be painted with roundup (at label strength).
Do not cut down the tree without spraying or painting it as well. The city (Delta) did this to one of these alongside our property some years ago and our lawn exploded with suckers.
This may seem like an overused phrase around here, but you would be well advised to get a professional arborist to look at this situation
Ralph
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old July 24th, 2005, 05:07 AM
wrygrass2's Avatar
wrygrass2 wrygrass2 is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Spokane, WA, USA
Posts: 577
Re: Thorn Trees

Hi CharlieGirl,

I found this page about killing Black Locust root suckers.

http://www.hort.uconn.edu/cipwg/art_...acklocust.html

If it is root suckers as Ralph described above, then I'm afraid the news is not great. It seems that short of treating the tree or tree stump with an herbicide just killing the tree will not do the trick and may make things much worse as Ralph's post above suggests. Couldn't find any less drastic measures than the one in the above website, but will look a little further this evening. I don't have much hope for an easy answer though. As Ralph suggested, talking to your local arborist is probably the best place to start, if you plan to remove the tree.

Harry
Reply With Quote
Post New ThreadReply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fruit Trees for Zone 2/3 TYW Fruit and Nut Trees 77 August 20th, 2011 02:19 PM
Japanese trees Stu in Tokyo Japan Plants: Identification 28 June 10th, 2008 07:46 PM
Help - Trees in Shock! fish&ferns HortForum 13 January 4th, 2007 04:18 PM
Transplanting pin oak trees donnacanadensis Woody Plants 5 January 21st, 2005 09:40 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2001-2011, University of British Columbia Botanical Garden & Centre for Plant Research