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  #1  
Old July 1st, 2005, 05:21 PM
Diana Diana is offline
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Location: Galiano Island BC
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Tomatoes-curled leaves

I have tomatoes planted in a raised bed. We used a mix of fish compost and topsoil. The plant stems were buried with all but top leaves removed. In the bottom of each planting hole I put shredded newspaper which had been soaked in seaweed fertilizer. they have been kept well watered, and have fertilised alternately with 'tomato food' and seaweed fertilizer. the plants are sturdy and healthy looking with lots of foliage.
Problem-last week or so-some leaves have started curling lengthwise. There is no sign of bug damage. I planted two types of tomato-determinate and indeterminate. Only the shorter type have the curled leaves. The other taller bushier type are okay.
I am not sure which one is determinate-maybe the smaller ones? All the plants are enclosed in cages.
Why are the leaves curling? I have checked my garden books, and the only explanation is a possible virus. Any ideas, suggestions are welcome. By the way I am on the Southern Gulf Islands.
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Old July 7th, 2005, 04:42 PM
j.imrie j.imrie is offline
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Location: Mayne Island, B.C.
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

I don't have any answers for you, but we are seeing the same problem here on Mayne. My plants are stunted, the leaves are curled lengthwise like yours, and the colour has gone dark blue with some yellow. I know a couple of others with the same problem.

Hope someone can come up with advice.

Janette.
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  #3  
Old July 7th, 2005, 07:41 PM
allison allison is offline
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

Hi there,

I'm having the same problem with my tomatoes. I first noticed that all but one plant had stopped growing, and in addition to the leaves curling, the leaves were turning bright yellow with purple veins. The affected plants were also very rigid and upright. Now it has spread to the remaining plant and my green peppers, which are in the greenhouse with the tomatoes.

From searching around on the Internet, I thought that maybe it was "curly top" virus. If that is the case, what can be done about it? Do I need to sterilze the pots and the greenhouse so that it doesn't return next year?

Allison
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  #4  
Old July 7th, 2005, 10:02 PM
Ralph Walton Ralph Walton is offline
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

The vestor for Beet curly top curtovirus is the beet leafhopper. The plants will not recover and should be removed ASAP to prevent or limit spread. The list of affected plants is huge and includes tomato and pepper plants. Sterilization of pots and other surfaces (while it may be a good idea for other afflictions) isn't going to have much effect. I believe there are egg parasites available, but you'd have to look for them.
Ralph
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Old July 8th, 2005, 06:44 PM
allison allison is offline
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

Ralph,

Thank you for the information. Do you know if this is rampant on the coast this year? I've never had the problem before, and I notice that the other posts on this topic are from gardeners on the gulf islands. If they have cycles like caterpillars, maybe next year the beet leafhopper won't be a problem? I hope....

Allison
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  #6  
Old July 9th, 2005, 07:55 AM
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mr.shep mr.shep is offline
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Location: San Joaquin Valley, California
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

I think a few photos of the leaf symptoms
would help. Here are two links that can be
used to possibly track down the problem.

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/t...ver/index.html

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/selec....tomatoes.html

From where I sit with no photos to work with
I am not so sure the problem is not attributed
to a severe nutrient deficiency. Tomatoes
require lots of potassium. Cool weather and
acid soil growing mediums will really slow
down potassium uptake by the roots. Around
here if the leaves show any blue to violet to
purple coloring it usually meant a potassium
deficiency, although a Nitrogen deficiency in
cool climates can also give the leaves a violet
colored hue.

Were any of these VFNT Tomatoes? Tomatoes
that are resistant to verticillium wilt, fusarium
wilt, nematodes and tobacco mosaic virus.

Jim
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  #7  
Old July 9th, 2005, 04:04 PM
Ralph Walton Ralph Walton is offline
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

Deficiencies are a definite possibility this year, even with fertilizers. Nitrogen in particular is easy to wash out and Lord knows we've had a lot of washing this spring and (alleged) summer. I did my usual field fertilizing this spring, but the areas subject to run off are easily visible (not as deep green and shorter).
Ralph
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Old June 28th, 2008, 11:24 AM
jhhspark3 jhhspark3 is offline
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Location: Jackson Hts., NY
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

I live in Queens, NYC. I have for the last 3 years planted tomatos in "earthboxes" and other such containers. The plants have grown well and I have gotten a good crop of tomatos to begin with. However, each year the leaves curl, turn yellow and then the fuit seems the stop producing. I found on your Web page the explanation of this condition, which you say is caused by Bemisia whiteflies. I have never seen them in this area, but that doesn't mean they don't exist. Is there anything I can do to get rid of them this year? Do you want any further information from me? Thanks
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  #9  
Old June 28th, 2008, 07:25 PM
Acoma Acoma is offline
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Location: Reno, Nevada Zone 6A
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Re: Tomatoes-curled leaves

My 2 cents. I had a long cool spring with a now hot summer. With this being my experimental large scale year, I tried pots for the tomato plants. I noticed yellowing and curling of the plants with no real growth when there should have been. I decided to take them from the pots to the raised bed. I found that the plants had poor drainage in the pots. I removed much of the lowere leaves, and planted 70% of the plants in the raised bed. It appears that the culprit was the drowning of the roots, even with every other week of fertilizing. I now switched to 1-week fertilizing, with daily moisturizing of the soil in the raised bed. Results after 2 weeks. Major turnaround. Beautiful green leaves, and new growth.

Reason for the story. Maybe you think you are just watering, but is drainage correct? Are you fertilizing 1-week? They are as needy as corn for nutrients. Take one of the plants out carefully to see how the roots are doing. Maybe dig down a foot next to the plant to see if soil is consistantly moist, or if it is moist then soaked. This makes such a huge difference as well to strength of plant and root system.. Then, make sure you are feeding them 1-week with nutrients.
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