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  #1  
Old October 31st, 2012, 10:07 PM
FrancoCan FrancoCan is offline
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edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

The Kousa dogwood is sometimes also called "Chinese dogwood", Korean Dogwood, or Japanese dogwood , Most Commonly used for landscaping

The fruit is a globose pink to red compound berry 2–3 cm in diameter, though these berries tend to grow larger towards the end of the season and some berry clusters that do not fall from the tree surpass 4 cm. It is edible, a sweet and delicious addition to the tree's ornamental value. The fruit is sometimes used for making wine source Wikipedia[/I]

Very subtle and delicate fruit with large seeds, not to sweet. You need patience and appreciation for this fruit
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Last edited by FrancoCan; October 31st, 2012 at 10:17 PM. Reason: addition to text
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  #2  
Old November 1st, 2012, 04:54 AM
Michael F Michael F is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Yep, can be delicious - I always stop to eat a few on the rare occasions I find one in fruit on my travels. Sadly, never planted around here in northern Britain (and even if it was, I suspect the summers here are too cold for it to ripen any fruit).
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Old November 1st, 2012, 12:13 PM
Ron B Ron B is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Cultivar 'Big Apple' was selected to be planted as a fruit tree. One I obtained as such, grew for years never cropped and was cut down recently. I suspect it was a seedling.

Delectability is not a generally shared, consistent experience with this species:

the fruit resembles dull raspberries of austere flavor and unpleasant texture

--A.L. Jacobson, Trees of Seattle - Second Edition (2006)
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Old November 1st, 2012, 12:35 PM
Michael F Michael F is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron B View Post
Delectability is not a generally shared, consistent experience with this species
I've noticed a degree of variation in the fruit quality, some barely worth eating, others delicious. Sounds like ALJ got poor specimen(s) to try. The best I've ever had was in Italy, so maybe warmer summers are important for fruit quality as well as productivity.
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Old November 1st, 2012, 12:52 PM
woodschmoe woodschmoe is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

I've had really good ones at various sites on Vancouver Island, but these have usually been a cultivar such as 'Milky Way', not the species form
which seems variable flavour-wise around here.

Also planted a few 'Big Apple' a couple of years ago on account of the reputed fruit production, no crops yet. Did see the first appearance of proto-fruits this season, which lingered for a bit then dried up/aborted...
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Old November 1st, 2012, 03:38 PM
Ron B Ron B is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

I had that happen for years. Nurseries do not always supply clones of original selections, by any means.
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Old November 23rd, 2013, 01:03 PM
woodschmoe woodschmoe is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

An update (possibly only exciting to me): actually ate a ripe fruit off one of my "Big Apple" today. It took four years and much aborted early fruits, and there was only one, but that's a 100% increase over the past. Interesting to see if successive seasons now witness more fruit, or if it's simply the lucky result of a very mild and dry Fall.
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Old November 23rd, 2013, 06:24 PM
Michael F Michael F is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Quote:
Originally Posted by woodschmoe View Post
there was only one, but that's a 100% increase over the past
That means it produced half a fruit last year ;-)

One up from none is actually an infinite % increase . . .

Did it taste good?
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Old November 23rd, 2013, 10:56 PM
woodschmoe woodschmoe is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

I stand mathematically corrected. However, the implied infinite percentage increase merely reflects the magnitude of my joy at actually seeing a fruit on it, which is infinitely better than none despite being, in the grand scheme of things, virtually nothing.

It was pretty good: mushy sweet like most kousa fruit I've tried.
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Old November 24th, 2013, 12:32 AM
Ron B Ron B is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Said to be eaten by monkeys in nature.
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  #11  
Old November 24th, 2013, 10:18 AM
woodschmoe woodschmoe is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron B View Post
Said to be eaten by monkeys in nature.
Also by apes, as I proved yesterday.
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Old November 24th, 2013, 10:34 AM
Ron B Ron B is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Native area for you but not for the tree.
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Old November 24th, 2013, 11:30 AM
woodschmoe woodschmoe is offline
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Re: edible dogwood fruit (kousa dogwood)

Give my ape lineage a bunch more generations hereabouts, and we'll make it native....you said "in nature", though, and I assure you: I was in nature whilst eating it, and my race to consume it ahead of the birds very much reflected a Hobbesian 'state of nature' ('all against all'). Unless you're suggesting that I'm some sort of supernatural ape, in which case I'd prefer to be referred to by the proper term Sasquatch.

Last edited by woodschmoe; November 24th, 2013 at 02:56 PM.
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