UBC Botanical Garden Forums  

» UBC Botanical Garden


Go Back   UBC Botanical Garden Forums > Outdoor Gardening in the Pacific Northwest

Post New ThreadReply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old January 16th, 2010, 08:06 PM
prettyhorses prettyhorses is offline
Registered (1-2 posts)
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: anchorage, ak usa
Posts: 1
growing heather

so if heathr grows really well in Scottland, will it grow equally as well in south central alaska???
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old January 17th, 2010, 02:56 AM
Michael F Michael F is offline
Plant Enthusiast (1000+ posts)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Britain zone 8/9
Posts: 9,742
Re: growing heather

It probably would, as long as you have well-drained acidic sandy soil. Quite a risk it might become invasive, in the right conditions.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old February 1st, 2010, 08:53 PM
janetdoyle's Avatar
janetdoyle janetdoyle is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Victoria [Saanich, actually, northeast of Victoria] , BC, Canada
Posts: 604
Re: growing heather

I find heather growing such a problem but seem to have found that lots of moisture and acid fertilizer help -- is this the right forum, by the way? I found that I had to use LARGE plants to plant or they dried out while immature, unless babied along with lots of watering. The soil puzzles me -- if sandy, and well-drained, one would need to water a lot [like Scotland's weather]. It's super dry in Victoria in the summer. Our condo landscaper said he'd heard that you could plant a new heather plant right on top of the central exposed stems of an old leggy one where it wasn't blooming [I didn't want to take out all the old stuff] -- so I experimented with this, put standard planting soil plus bagged compost from the nursery on top of the exposed stems, mixed with acid fertilizer, and planted the heather. They took! Got the required drainage, I suppose. Meanwhile I cut the old leggy one back a lot and it is doing much better, maybe partly the fertilizer. I fertilized a lot, with a lot of different fertilizers [this was not a well-controlled experiment], trying to mimic what I would think would be the sheep-fertilized heathers of Scotland... and it seems to be working. My big problem was I couldn't or didn't remember whether some are early winter heathers or summer heathers [now I think I've got it straight from observation] and forgot to prune [trim tops] at the right time... is a summer heather now putting some top growth out on the tips of the old browned blossom sprigs ok to shear now or because it's starting to develop buds should I leave it alone for this year? Will it re-develop buds if I did shear it now?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old February 16th, 2010, 01:47 PM
Daniel Mosquin's Avatar
Daniel Mosquin Daniel Mosquin is offline
UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 7,761
Re: growing heather

If no luck getting a confirmed answer here, you may want to try contacting the North American Heather Society, perhaps to ask if they have any members in Alaska you can communicate with.

My gut feeling is that yes, some will grow there, but if you're not finding it at local nurseries, then perhaps not.
__________________
Please consider giving to UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research, to support its mission of excellence in plant research, education and conservation.

Daniel Mosquin
Research Manager
UBC Botanical Garden | BC Flora | John Davidson
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old February 16th, 2010, 03:03 PM
janetdoyle's Avatar
janetdoyle janetdoyle is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Victoria [Saanich, actually, northeast of Victoria] , BC, Canada
Posts: 604
Re: growing heather

The Alaska resident might want to check out the Q&A at
http://www.northamericanheathersoc.org/Site4/frame1.htm -- Pruning heather is discussed at workshops, in newsletters, etc., too. The various Chapters of the North American Heather Society and their executive members with all their contact information are listed. I now will have a source to go to for questions, and whether or not to do pruning on the summer heathers when it has been let go too [?] late and the new growth is starting at the tip of a spent flower stalk.

Last edited by janetdoyle; February 16th, 2010 at 11:01 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old February 18th, 2010, 07:51 PM
Ron B Ron B is offline
Ardent Plant Enthusiast (10000+ posts)
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Edmonds, WA USA (Z8)
Posts: 18,535
Re: growing heather

Probably there will be some native heathers somewhere near there, too, if the region is suitable. If the imports don't like it maybe you can play with these instead.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old February 19th, 2010, 07:40 AM
janetdoyle's Avatar
janetdoyle janetdoyle is offline
Generous Contributor (500-999 posts)
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Victoria [Saanich, actually, northeast of Victoria] , BC, Canada
Posts: 604
Re: growing heather

Re pruning summer heather "late" in early spring: [re various climates, my own question]

One of the executive members replied to me regarding this, via email [see above Heather society] and indicated that yes, one can prune summer-bloomers now even though the new tips are coming on top of the older spent bloom from last fall... that some gardeners choose to do so to delay bloom for whatever reason... so I have trimmed off a combination of spent blooms and spent blooms with tiny new tips... therefore they may be a bit late. Will be an interesting experiment. Other summer/fall-bloomers did get pruned earlier, a different variety, and some are not yet showing any new tips...
Reply With Quote
Post New ThreadReply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are Off
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
It looks like a Heather. Beeker Plants: Identification 2 March 22nd, 2009 02:56 PM
Heath/heather: oxalis + woodiness lotsofroses Woody Plants 3 July 3rd, 2008 03:47 PM
Identification: What am I growing? Peter Pasceri Indoor and Greenhouse Plants 5 September 19th, 2007 08:58 PM
Looking for companion needed for yucca, cotoneaster and heather Irish Garden Design and Plant Suggestions 4 September 18th, 2007 02:03 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:39 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright 2001-2011, University of British Columbia Botanical Garden & Centre for Plant Research