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  #1  
Old July 24th, 2009, 12:52 PM
catacomb catacomb is offline
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Winter Crops

So I'm a rookie to this whole gardening thing. Not having too much trouble with the summer crops, but since most of those are close to finishing for the year now I'm wondering what to plant for fall and winter.
I've seen a few suggestions like onions, garlic, radishes, broccoli and carrots...but is that really it?
I figure there's got to be more out there right? So please send me your suggestions. I figure anything is worth a try :)
Location: Pacific Northwest, specifically Vancouver BC

Thanks!
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Old July 24th, 2009, 04:37 PM
JanR JanR is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

You could also plant peas, lettuce, spinach, and beans. I planted some at this time last year and got a nice crop of peas, beans and carrots.
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Old July 24th, 2009, 11:19 PM
vitog vitog is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

Two crops that produce well through the winter season in Vancouver are brussels sprouts and leeks. Winter cabbage will also work, I assume, although I don't grow it because it's so cheap to buy. There are also several varieties of winter cauliflower (white and purple) that will produce crops early next spring. Arugula also does well during the winter and adds a nice flavour to salads. I understand that collards and kale are also good as winter crops; I plan to try them myself but haven't yet.
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  #4  
Old July 25th, 2009, 12:00 AM
The Hollyberry Lady The Hollyberry Lady is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

Oh, don't forget about Swiss Chard and Romaine Lettuce for Fall also.

: )
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  #5  
Old August 3rd, 2009, 08:20 AM
Keke Keke is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

Did anyone suggest cilantro and parsley to you? Fava (broad) beans and garlic also go in in the fall for an earlier spring/summer harvest the following year -- also results in bigger garlic cloves, I find.

Depending on the severity of the winter I have enjoyed salad out of the garden on Christmas Day (always a nice thing to talk about with relatives in the East on the annual Christmas phone call, LOL).

Out here, what is usually the determining factor is not the cold, but the day length and the heavy rain. You must start the winter stuff before you think you should (late August - early Sept) to get it to a reasonable size before the sun goes away. Once the rains start I also put temporary plastic row covers over the greens to keep them from being drowned.

And remember, with cut-and-come-again stuff, what you pick will probably not regenerate before spring, so be judicious about picking over the winter.

keke
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Old August 19th, 2009, 10:12 AM
fats fats is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

I am also new to gardening and have had a very successful summer garden but am wondering how winter crops work. Do I plant them in starter pots then transplant? My summer crop of tomatoes and brussel sprouts have not matured yet, and neither have my watermellons, so I am wondering how people go about planting their winter crops?
Vancouver, BC
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Old August 19th, 2009, 12:21 PM
The Hollyberry Lady The Hollyberry Lady is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

When you say 'winter crops' - are you talking about growing stuff outside? I must remember you are in B.C. where it is much milder.

We drop well below zero in the winter and everything freezes solid, so my winter crops are all indoors! It doesn't hinder me though. I've even produced strawberries, tomatoes, sweet and hot peppers, lettuce, herbs, swiss chard, eggplant, and dwarf cucumbers inside over the cold months!


: O


P.S. I have a 400w metal halide light system and use a SunMaster warm deluxe bulb.
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Old August 19th, 2009, 06:09 PM
Keke Keke is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

Quote:
Originally Posted by fats View Post
I am also new to gardening and have had a very successful summer garden but am wondering how winter crops work. Do I plant them in starter pots then transplant? My summer crop of tomatoes and brussel sprouts have not matured yet, and neither have my watermellons, so I am wondering how people go about planting their winter crops?
Nope, just choose spots where early crops were and plant there -- I usually rotate mine so the kale is where the lettuce was, and the onions are where the peas were, etc. And plant direct -- with the sun getting less you want to avoid transplant shock.

keke
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Old August 19th, 2009, 07:30 PM
The Hollyberry Lady The Hollyberry Lady is offline
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Re: Winter Crops

Some people can have a tough time with direct garden sowing, and can't even get the seeds to germinate let alone take off into producing veggie plants. Often times, beginners and even experienced gardeners too, are better off starting in little starter pots, then transplanting later.

The reason for this is because when plants are young, tender, sensitive seedlings, they can get ruined by harsh weather because they are not yet established. Being in starter pots enables you to protect them, and move them out of harm's way if necessary for awhile.

I am experienced at gardening, but I still love to begin most of my plants in starter pots, to make sure they get off to a good start. I can pamper them better when they're close to me in pots and ensure their success. Then when their roots have filled the pots, I transplant to the garden.

Keep fresh transplants out of the sun for at least 24 hours - if not a few days. I like to transplant my young seedlings on overcast, rainy days, which will nearly guarantee the plant getting over any transplant shock whatsoever.

Good Luck, Fats.


: )


HAPPY GARDENING
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