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  #1  
Old December 11th, 2008, 10:22 AM
Gardenlover Gardenlover is offline
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Grafting fruit tree

I have the basic idea of grafting an apple tree. Pick a nice clean piece branch store it in the fridge keeping it moist...but where does one get a rootstock of their choice to experiment?

I want to graft a honeycrisp apple on a semi dwarf rootstock!
any grafting pros here that can talk me through this?
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  #2  
Old December 11th, 2008, 07:29 PM
Ralph Walton Ralph Walton is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Start here:
http://www.cyberfruit.info/apple-nursery.asp

Ralph
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  #3  
Old December 11th, 2008, 08:16 PM
Millet Millet is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Home gardeners usually find cleft grafting, bark grafting and T-budding on seedlings or purchased root stocks the most practical and easiest methods. Both seed, young seedlings, and dwarfing rootstock are available from nurseries and seed houses. Many times it is possible to start a few dwarf rootstocks yourself, by carefully digging up the suckers from around the trunks of dwarf trees. Because dwarf and semi-dwarf apples are popular, many nurseries propagate rootstocks by layers, stools, and tissue culture. The two most popular dwarf rootstocks are East Malling (EM) and Merton malling (MM). The rootstocks vary somewhat in vigor and their adaptability to different soil conditions, as well as the ultimate size of the tree produced. They also vary in hardiness. Many dwarf rootstocks are unsuitable for the coldest sections of the country. Dwarfs tend to be shallow rooted, and may not be the best choice where hard winds are prevalent. Below is a list of common dwarf rootstocks.

EM2 = 10-ft tree Good for clay soils.
EM7 = 8-ft tree. (Widely used rootstock)
EM9 = 6-ft. tree (good rootstock for espaliers)
EM26 = 8-ft. tree (Often gets some winter injury in the North)
EM27 = Most dwarfing of all, and most hardy. Need well drained soil.

MM104 = Semi-dwarf 11-ft. tree
MM106 = 9-ft. tree. Need well drained soil & long growing season.
MM109 = Semi-dwarf and very productive.
MM111 = Vigorous, productive and good for warmer climates. Widely used in commercial orchards.

Grootendorst Nursery (Good supplier for dwarf rootstocks for grafting)
Lakeside, MI 49116

Millet

Last edited by Millet; December 12th, 2008 at 05:53 PM.
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  #4  
Old December 12th, 2008, 10:32 AM
Gardenlover Gardenlover is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Quote:
Originally Posted by Millet View Post
Home gardeners usually find cleft grafting, bark grafting and T-budding on seedlings or purchased root stocks the most practical and easiest methods. Both seed, young seedlings, and dwarfing rootstock may are available from nurseries and seed houses. Many times it is possible to start a few dwarf rootstocks yourself, by carefully digging up the suckers from around the trunks of dwarf trees. Because dwarf and semi-dwarf apples are popular, many nurseries propagate rootstocks by layers, stools, and tissue culture. The two most popular dwarf rootstocks are East Malling (EM) and Merton malling (MM). The rootstocks vary somewhat in vigor and their adaptability to different soil conditions, as well as the ultimate size of the tree produced. They also vary in hardiness. Many dwarf rootstocks are unsuitable for the coldest sections of the country. Dwarfs tend to be shallow rooted, and may not be the best choice where hard winds are prevalent. Below is a list of common dwarf rootstocks.

EM2 = 10-ft tree Good for clay soils.
EM7 = 8-ft tree. (Widely used rootstock)
EM9 = 6-ft. tree (good rootstock for espaliers)
EM26 = 8-ft. tree (Often gets some winter injury in the North)
EM27 = Most dwarfing of all, and most hardy. Need well drained soil.

MM104 = Semi-dwarf 11-ft. tree
MM106 = 9-ft. tree. Need well drained soil & long growing season.
MM109 = Semi-dwarf and very productive.
MM111 = Vigorous, productive and good for warmer climates. Widely used in commercial orchards.

Grootendorst Nursery (Good supplier for dwarf rootstocks for grafting)
Lakeside, MI 49116

Millet
thanks for the info millet.
I am familiar with alot of these above listed rootstocks they are suseptible to fire blight and collar rot.
According to reaearch rootstocks: M7, Geneva 11, 30 & 65 are resistant to fire blight e.t.c.
What is your opinion on these rootstocks....where can one find them?
thanks
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  #5  
Old December 12th, 2008, 06:07 PM
Millet Millet is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Try Cummins Nursery, they are in New York. Not all that distant. - Millet

http://www.cumminsnursery.com/rootstocks.htm
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Old December 13th, 2008, 02:18 PM
Gardenlover Gardenlover is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Quote:
Originally Posted by Millet View Post
Try Cummins Nursery, they are in New York. Not all that distant. - Millet

http://www.cumminsnursery.com/rootstocks.htm
I'm in contact with him....he has the Geneva series which is disease resistant and old home rootstocks for pears....most nurseries don't even answer their email. Mr. Cummins replied very quickly good customer service...imo
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  #7  
Old December 17th, 2008, 08:42 AM
Gardenlover Gardenlover is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Looks like the choice is Geneva 16 rootstock...highly recommended.
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  #8  
Old December 17th, 2008, 08:54 AM
biggam biggam is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardenlover View Post
Looks like the choice is Geneva 16 rootstock...highly recommended.
This is recommended rootstock, but you need virus-indexed scion material to be sure the rootstock doesn't become infected with a latent virus. Geneva 11 might be a better choice; it is about the size of M26.
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  #9  
Old December 19th, 2008, 11:14 AM
Gardenlover Gardenlover is offline
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Re: Grafting fruit tree

Quote:
Originally Posted by biggam View Post
This is recommended rootstock, but you need virus-indexed scion material to be sure the rootstock doesn't become infected with a latent virus. Geneva 11 might be a better choice; it is about the size of M26.
the guy who is grafting it is taking the precautions...
Geneva 11 has higher disease tendencies(from the rest of Geneva series) toward fire blight e.t.c.
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