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Old November 7th, 2007, 12:48 PM
SteveInBx SteveInBx is offline
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Pruning paste for cherry tree

I read an article (http://www.treehelp.com/trees/cherry/care.asp) that says to use non-asphalt-based pruning paste on pruned cherry trees.

Any opinions on asphalt-based vs non-asphalt-based pruning paste for this?

Steve
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Old November 7th, 2007, 02:06 PM
Ian61 Ian61 is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

Wound Dressings

Wound dressings were once thought to accelerate wound closure, protect against insects and diseases, and reduce decay. However, research has shown that dressings do not reduce decay or speed closure and rarely prevent insect or disease infestations. Most experts recommend that wound dressings not be used. If a dressing must be used for cosmetic purposes, then only a thin coating of a nontoxic material should be applied.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 02:41 PM
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HortLine HortLine is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

Knowing that wound dressings are no longer worthwhile does not mean that
thought cannot be given to the healing process: proper pruning (outside of the branch collar) will help to accelerate the speed at which a plant can seal off the open wound.
You may want to look up information of the pruning of trees: the timing of the cut is crutial to how the plant will heal; the extent of the branch removal will also play a part and may have to be staggered over several years in order to promote the best health of the tree; the ulitimate age to which a tree (shrubs) are able to maintain good health also varies,some plants will not heal as expected as they are not long lived.

The Cherry Tree that you are looking after may in fact be quite old: they are not actually very long lived trees. Any severe pruning may do more harm to the plant than you might expect, and so you decision to prune is based on many factors. You might look in other sections of this hortboard to learn more about some of these issues. Good luck to you and thank you for contacting us.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 02:46 PM
jascha jascha is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

I use Doc Farwell's Seal and Heal to prevent pruning cuts from dying back and to keep fungus out. It's a non-asphalt based sealant with a fair amount of elasticity so the seal maintains it's integrity longer as the tree grows. It seems to work well for me. More importantly, however, is the cleanliness of your pruning tools. You should clean your pruning tools with rubbing alcohol...ideally between cuts, but at least between performing cuts on two different trees. This helps to prevent the spread of fungus and disease.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 03:07 PM
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Dixie Dixie is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

prune in the winter when diseases and insects are less of an issue. i wouldn't apply any wound dressing either. it is not recommended anymore, unless you prune on oaks in areas where oak wilt or sudden oak death is a problem.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 04:00 PM
jascha jascha is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

You are only supposed to prune cherry trees during the dry summer months to reduce the risk of silverleaf (fungal infection). Also, for mature fruiting trees, summer pruning helps to reduce vegetative growth and stimulate more fruit bud production.
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Old November 7th, 2007, 04:28 PM
Michael F Michael F is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

Cherries (and plums) can have pruning cuts painted with a suspension of Trichoderma viride (or other Trichoderma species) spores. This is a fungal parasite that actively controls tree disease fungi like Chondrostereum purpureum (silverleaf disease).

How easy it is to get Trichoderma spores, I don't know. They may only be available to commercial orchard growers.
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Old November 8th, 2007, 07:13 AM
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

Quote:
Originally Posted by jascha View Post
You are only supposed to prune cherry trees during the dry summer months to reduce the risk of silverleaf (fungal infection). Also, for mature fruiting trees, summer pruning helps to reduce vegetative growth and stimulate more fruit bud production.

he didn't specify if it was for fruit production or an ornamental cherry. through the ISA there is beginning to be some recommendations for pruning in the summer due to the fact that the tree is actively growing and can callous over more rapidly than in the winter. However, if it is during disease prone times, I would use caution when pruning during summer months, unless for fruit production. just depends on the poster's reason for pruning.
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Old November 8th, 2007, 11:39 PM
Ottawa-Zone5 Ottawa-Zone5 is offline
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Re: Pruning paste for cherry tree

I was hesitant to ask this question. I was asking myself if I should or should not ask this but decided why not (since I do not know the answer myself).
The pruning wound is coated so that external agents causing harm are kept away until the tree does its own corrective actions just like the human body. If it is a small brach that is pruned then will it help or harm to use honey (or say olive oil) as a coat because honey was used in the past on human wounds?
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